216 GSi - Boot Spoiler Refitting - Advice/Experiences sought

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StubbornPatriot
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216 GSi - Boot Spoiler Refitting - Advice/Experiences sought

#1 Post by StubbornPatriot » Tue May 21, 2019 9:24 pm

Hi, my boot spoiler has now become completely detached from its mounting. Any advice and/or experience to pass on as to the best way to refit it please? I presume it is just stuck on, but obviously it would also need to be detachable again if I ever needed to remove the mounting. Is it fixed originally with a double sided tape on the squishy 'gasket'? Any guidance gratefully received. Thanks, Duncan.
1989 216GSI + 1990 216GSI + 1997 416 Tourer + Triumph T160V

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Re: 216 GSi - Boot Spoiler Refitting - Advice/Experiences sought

#2 Post by 1234dist » Tue May 21, 2019 9:27 pm

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Re: 216 GSi - Boot Spoiler Refitting - Advice/Experiences sought

#3 Post by Johnny 216GSi » Tue May 21, 2019 11:19 pm

StubbornPatriot wrote:
Tue May 21, 2019 9:24 pm
Hi, my boot spoiler has now become completely detached from its mounting. Any advice and/or experience to pass on as to the best way to refit it please? I presume it is just stuck on, but obviously it would also need to be detachable again if I ever needed to remove the mounting. Is it fixed originally with a double sided tape on the squishy 'gasket'? Any guidance gratefully received. Thanks, Duncan.
I assume you've got the shell on the floor and a black strip still bolted to the car?

That strip was glued into the outer moulding when it was new. There are 5 bolts that go through the edge of the boot. You have to remove the grey trim that covers the inside of the lower hatch - which is two very noddy expanding trim clips (one each side) and then the rest are the same squeeze-fit metal clips you find holding in the A/B/C post trim, etc. You can lever it off along the lower edge and sides - use something like a paper scraper (broad and flat to spread the load) but cover it in a cloth to prevent scratches. To get it off completely, once the lower long side is free and it looks like it'll come off, you have to knock (with the palm of your hand) upwards as if you're pushing the trim up towards the top of the hatch glass. This is because the remaining trim clips holding it in place face upwards into it from the hatch metalwork just under the rear window. It's counter-intuitive I suppose. You'll get lots of squeaking noises as those metal clips let go of the bodywork - quite unnerving and puts you off going further with removal but do persist. I've had that trim off so many times on my car, I can part the lower section and get the whole thing off just using the palm of my hand as a hammer with glancing blows in the right direction - rather like a dent removal man trying to contract stretched metal.

You should remove the spade electrical connectors to the rear demister. As you knock on the bottom of the trim panel, the upper edges will travel up a bit further under the side grey trim where the wires come out - this puts strain on them and they can detach the tabs from the screen if you're not careful.

With the trim off, the 5 nyloc nuts holding on the rear strip can be accessed with a long nut spinner via large access holes in the hatch on the inside. You'd use a few of these cut-outs to remove the rear wiper motor, etc. too if the need ever arises. The nuts might be rusted up. Not sure how the heads of those bolts are moulded into the strip (I think they're a square plate) - you might be able to grip the heads and turn the nuts at the same time, but you might also need some assistance. If it comes to it, you might have to cut the bolts off in some way - I guess it's up to you how you do this - how much of the inner strip gets damaged in the process and whether there's any way of fitting and securing new bolt(s).

I had my local garage remove the remains of the strip from my car and unfortunately they pretty much destroyed it in the process, but the hatch lid was unscathed. First replacement spoiler I purchased was from a car I'd seen. It had been bonded back together with some sort of sealant and I didn't realise. It sat very proud on the car, so I decided to cut all the sealant off the inside with a knife. Then to glue the inner section back in, I used epoxy resin and I bought 12 mini G-clamps. It's tricky to get it to push far enough in that the spoiler then looks right on the car - the outer casing collapses a little and pushing that thin strip back in far enough and clamping it is night on impossible. I did manage it, but induced a slight kink in the top edge because of how tight I'd clamped it as the glue dried. I've still got that spoiler and it's on the car at the moment. I found a replacement that I took off a scrap car myself - had it all painted to match - then the paint started to react to what was underneath. My guess is that it had already been re-sprayed with the scrap car and whatever paint they'd used - it just wasn't compatible with the Valspar Octocryl paint I'd purchased. The paint lifted like a drum skin - awful - and much worse in hot weather. So that came off and the one I'd glued with a slight warp went back on. The better one I've got will go on the car eventually - when I get the paint sorted out properly.
Last edited by Johnny 216GSi on Wed May 22, 2019 9:50 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 216 GSi - Boot Spoiler Refitting - Advice/Experiences sought

#4 Post by GTiJohn » Wed May 22, 2019 7:02 am

Now that's what I call a comprehensive answer :clapping
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Re: 216 GSi - Boot Spoiler Refitting - Advice/Experiences sought

#5 Post by tonyinbeds » Thu May 23, 2019 9:44 am

After several attempts with various glues, all of which failed, I spread lots of clear silicone on the boot and temporarily taped the spoiler on until silicone had set. It has remained affixed ever since (2-3 years) A botch but worked.
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Tony

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Re: 216 GSi - Boot Spoiler Refitting - Advice/Experiences sought

#6 Post by Johnny 216GSi » Thu May 23, 2019 10:35 am

tonyinbeds wrote:
Thu May 23, 2019 9:44 am
After several attempts with various glues, all of which failed, I spread lots of clear silicone on the boot and temporarily taped the spoiler on until silicone had set. It has remained affixed ever since (2-3 years) A botch but worked.
The glue I used was Araldite standard (slow cure). It's still holding the spoiler together even now. It's my go-to glue for waterproof repairs and it's useful for all sorts of other things - sealed my headlining shell with it and have reinforced my door cards with it. It's just a bit expensive when you choose to use it that way. In some ways I'm surprised it's held so well. My feeling is that retail products people can get hold of just aren't as good as the products manufacturers use, full stop - presumably because we can't be trusted with them or they're too hazardous without proper precautions and disposal.

I also like the original Gorilla glue if you've ever tried it - water activated and you can get a good bond - even on odd things like rubber. The only problem with Gorilla glue is that it expands (this actually helps fill the bond area with glue), so clamping is essential. It can result in a messy join if it's something that can be seen and the glue has pushed out everywhere of course, but it's about gauging the right amount to begin with.

The only sealant I've used is Sikaflex 291i in black. This also seems to stick extremely well, forms a flexible bond, and lasts. I can see why people like sealants for bonding and the Sikaflex stuff is marine-grade (salt water resistant) - used for mending boat hulls. It should do the trick anywhere on the car where a standard glue won't work.
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